Jesuits

[[Christogram]]{{pb}} The Society of Jesus (; abbreviation: SJ), also known as the Jesuit Order or the Jesuits ( ; ), is a religious order of clerics regular of pontifical right for men in the Catholic Church headquartered in Rome. It was founded in 1540 by Ignatius of Loyola and six companions, with the approval of Pope Paul III. The society is engaged in evangelization and apostolic ministry in 112 nations. Jesuits work in education, research, and cultural pursuits. Jesuits also conduct retreats, minister in hospitals and parishes, sponsor direct social and humanitarian ministries, and promote ecumenical dialogue.

The Society of Jesus is consecrated under the patronage of Madonna della Strada, a title of the Blessed Virgin Mary, and it is led by a superior general. The headquarters of the society, its general curia, is in Rome. The historic curia of Ignatius is now part of the attached to the Church of the Gesù, the Jesuit mother church.

Members of the Society of Jesus make profession of "perpetual poverty, chastity, and obedience" and "promise a special obedience to the sovereign pontiff in regard to the missions" to the effect that a Jesuit is expected to be directed by the pope "''perinde ac cadaver''" ("as if he was a lifeless body") and to accept orders to go anywhere in the world, even if required to live in extreme conditions. This was so because Ignatius, its leading founder, was a nobleman who had a military background. Accordingly, the opening lines of the founding document declared that the society was founded for "whoever desires to serve as a soldier of God,}} to strive especially for the defense and propagation of the faith, and for the progress of souls in Christian life and doctrine". Jesuits are thus sometimes referred to colloquially as "God's soldiers", "God's marines", or "the Company". The society participated in the Counter-Reformation and, later, in the implementation of the Second Vatican Council.

Jesuit missionaries established missions around the world from the 16th to the 18th century and had both successes and failures in Christianizing the native peoples. The Jesuits have always been controversial within the Catholic Church and have frequently clashed with secular governments and institutions. Beginning in 1759, the Catholic Church expelled Jesuits from most countries in Europe and from European colonies. Pope Clement XIV officially suppressed the order in 1773. In 1814, the Church lifted the suppression. Provided by Wikipedia
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    by Well-wisher to the Jesuits
    Published 1658
    Microform Book
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    Published 1887
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    Published 1938
    ...Jesuits. United States...
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    Published 1954
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    Published 1969
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    Published 1970
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    by Gelfand, Michael
    Published 1969
    ...Jesuits...
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    Published 1973
    ...Jesuits...
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    by Ledesma, Andres de, -1684
    Published 1975
    ...Jesuits...
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    by Donnelly, Joseph P.
    Published 1967
    ...Jesuits...
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    Published 1959
    ...Jesuits...
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    Published 1927
    ...Jesuits...
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    by Bigot, Jacques, 1644-1711
    Published 1865
    ...Jesuits...
    Microform Book
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